The most important part of saving is to never buy equipment unless you're positive that it will increase your earning potential, or significantly speed your character's leveling progress. While it is true that gear is important (particularly for melee combat characters), it is also true that an overemphasis on having great gear before maximum level is dumb. Who cares if you're wearing a green sword at level 43? If you're advancing well, you aren't going to be level 43 for very long anyway. The only gear that currently "counts" is max level gear.
I recommend not counting on transmog sells for your monthly gametime. Its a great market, but also pretty random. You have to have the right items posted at the right moment if a player needs a certain item. If this is not the case, of course you will not sell anything to him. There are people making millions of golds a month with transmog. But they are very professional at it and it really takes a lot of time.

Of course this is pure speculation, but who thought the token would be beneath 200.000 Gold again? But the only thing important for you is to calculate at what point you make profit by selling the tokens again. If you consider it, you should take the risk! Worst case scenario: You have a lot of battle.net balance to spend for Gametime, mounts, pets and boosts/services!


The raid is made up of eight bosses that each have interesting and unique mechanics. Some bosses might put extra pressure on the DPS players to kill an add before it can heal the boss, while others might require players to move around the environment in a specific pattern or order, all the while still doing as much damage to the boss as possible or keeping the group alive through healing. While past raids often repeated mechanics or had one or two boring fights that didn’t ask much of the players, each encounter in Uldir feels unique and challenging. It’s been a long time since we had a raid where each fight was as much fun to do over and over again as the fights in Uldir.
Mythic+ has some similarity to raiding, but it’s designed for just five players, instead of the 10-to-30 that can make up a raid. This mode tasks players with clearing the game’s dungeons, but with specific changes that make them harder, scaling up until it’s impossible for groups to finish. Players receive a keystone in their inventory that assigns them their dungeon, one of the game’s 10, and gives the dungeon a level. This determines how difficult enemies are and what effects might make them harder. If the group completes the keystone in time, they get a new, higher-level stone; if they, don’t they get a lower-level stone.

At the end of Legion, the titan Sargeras was imprisoned, but not before he plunged his sword into the planet Azeroth. This not only devastated a massive area (much of the desert zone of Silithus is now cracked and scorched), but badly wounded the gestating titan inside. While the heroes managed to ablate the worst of the damage (at the cost of the majority of their artifact weapons' mythic power), the world is still wounded and bleeding a substance called "Azerite," which has great magical potential. The Horde Warchief, Sylvanas Windrunner, attempts to consolidate Horde power on Kalimdor and gain a monopoly on Azerite (which is primarily found at the southern end of the continent). Her campaign to do so, the War of Thorns, formed a pre-launch event for the expansion and ends with the major Night Elf holdings on the continent seized or (in the case of their capital city of Darnassus) annihilated. The Alliance makes a retaliatory strike against her home base, the Undercity, which was formerly the human capital of Lordaeron. This succeeds in driving the Horde out, but before leaving Sylvanas saturates the area with disease and toxins that render it uninhabitable. With this tit-for-tat military exchange, the Horde has almost complete control over Kalimdor, while the Alliance has near-total dominion over the Eastern Kingdoms.[4] With further conflict inevitable, Battle for Azeroth takes the two factions to the continents of Kul Tiras and Zandalar to recruit new allies in order to turn the tides of war.[4]
In Battle for Azeroth, the developers are getting away from grand space opera theatrics and broad strokes and into grittier territory. So far, there have been some wins: Zones like Drustvar and Nazmir have been intriguing stories set in gorgeous setpieces. There have also been raging controversies, like the one around Warbringers: Sylvanas. So far, one of the biggest challenges the writers have is dealing with a world that is hard-locked into two factions.
Be cold-blooded about admitting that you've taken a bath on an item. If you bought that sword for 5g, listed it for 10g, and the listing cost is 2g50s each time, after two times it had better sell just to break even. Once you hit that point, don't keep listing it over and over in desperation trying to make something off the AH. D/E it, or vendor it, and move on. Lesson learned. Don't get trapped in the fallacy of sunk costs.
You can earn a decent amount of XP by doing Herbalism or mining. Any zone works but I prefer Sholazar Basin as a lot of the mobs are not aggressive and the mobs are spread out so you will find a lot of herbs and ore that you don’t have to fight for. It is possible to make about a level every hour by doing this, or a level every 30-40 minutes with rest XP.
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