This includes the “Tides of Vengeance” campaign missions, which continue the War campaign introduced when the expansion launched. Two new island expeditions called Jorundall and Havenswood were also added. Weekly quests also require less Azerite than they did in the past, Mythic and player-versus-player islands award more Artifact power, and new vendors were made available.
The problem with Battle for Azeroth’s endgame is that a culling of abilities, the loss of Legion’s legendaries, and a lack of endgame talents means that hitting the max level doesn’t necessarily make your character more fun to play. Your character is a vehicle to explore new content, and it doesn’t matter how stunning the vista is if the core gameplay loop you’ll execute a few thousand times just isn’t fun.
Different qualities aren't limited only to wild pets—many rare World drops and special non-wild companions have had their stats boosted. For example, the world-drop dragon whelps (Azure Whelpling, Crimson Whelpling, Dark Whelpling, and Emerald Whelpling) are of [rare] quality. Check your Pet Journal to see the color-coded rarity of your non-wild pets.
I think you are referring to the Env Bert strat I have linked. Basically I agree. But you might have noticed that I already had added min power to pet #2, in order to exclude some of the substitutes. Though, I didn’t wan’t to do the same with the Blazehaound (pet #1), because I think the strat is doable also with a suboptimal breed. But maybe you are right and I should just exclude any non-P/P breeds.
Note that these general principles do not apply to blue or purple items. If you are a first-time player, there is absolutely no reason to purchase these items. None. Sub-80 rare and epic items are only for the alts or twinks of established players that have money to waste (because that's what it is) by showing off their Staff of Jordan (or whatever). Blues and purples are completely cost-ineffective for first-time characters. Within a few levels, you will find green gear that is roughly comparable, or you'll get better blues from instance runs at the same level. So, do not buy these items, under any circumstances, if you are a first-time character (no matter how cool they look). And even if you're reasonably well-off financially, think twice. This is especially true as your character gets closer to levels 58 and 68. Even the most basic quest-reward gear in Outland will have substantially better stats than anything you can buy off the AH for a level 56 character. The same is true of Northrend gear at level 68 vis-a-vis the stuff you'll get in Outland at level 68. As such, smart players stop making AH gear purchases by about level 54 or so, and then just gut it out until level 58. The same is true at levels 64-68. Within the first several quests in Hellfire and/or Northrend you'll have replaced half of your gear in any case, guaranteed.
For instance, Horde players see their story through an oppressively dark light, and it’s easy to see why. The Horde exclusive content — the War of the Thorns, the end-game war campaign, and the Darkshore quests and warfront — is all focused on killing, blighting, burning, betraying, and raising people into undeath. Yet canonically, the Horde is the one who stopped G’huun in Uldir and saved the world. The Alliance had access to the exact same content, just with less lore and story. The Horde players don’t get the balance of feeling like they saved the world, because it would mean Alliance players would sit on their hands for months watching the rest of the players advance.

Enchanting is a crafting profession that allows you to enchant gear with stat increases. It also allows you to disenchant gear for crafting materials. Enchanting uses crafting materials that can only be obtained from disenchanting gear. This means the only source is either crafting yourself or buying from other players. As the profession mostly revolves around stat increases only the legion recipes are relevant. The main ways to make gold with the profession is crafting and selling enchants and doing the enchanting shuffle. You can also make tomes of illusions, but they have fairly low demand.


Before you begin, you must decide on whether or not to enable War Mode. War Mode makes it so that you will only see other players with War Mode enabled, which also enables PvP activity. Note that if you are in a party with someone not on War Mode while you are, you will be unable to see him or her. War Mode provides an experience buff as well as the enabling of three PvP talents that will greatly increase your power. Regardless of whether or not you enable War Mode, your objectives will remain the same in that you must complete all quest content to unlock flying later on and many of your War Campaign and Allied Race requirements. War Mode enables 10% bonus experience, 10% better rewards from World Quests, and allows for the gathering of Conquest points which can be used to buy gear. If you do play on War Mode, it is recommended to play with friends. Leveling without War Mode will not be significantly more time consuming.
If you find yourself coveting your first mount, and with no money to purchase it, try to swallow your frustration and work at earning and saving up so you can buy it honestly. Nothing is more annoying to other players who are working hard to earn their own money than hearing someone begging for gold so that they can buy a mount or fancy piece of gear.
While leveling, try to make use of the new Battle of Azeroth experience gem, Insightful Rubellite, which gives you +5% experience. Equipping one of these requires a socket in your gear, so try to hold on to a piece of Legion gear with a socket or acquire one of the Legion Legendary rings since every class has one. Each of the rings includes a socket. You can acquire one of these rings rather easily by doing World Quests in Legion zones and acquiring 1,000 Wakening Essences that can be used to purchase a legendary ring in the Legion version of Dalaran.
The Horde and Alliance established footholds in Kul Tiras and Zandalar, seeking to use these staging points to launch large-scale assaults deep into enemy territory. These assaults cycle regularly between Kul Tiras and Zandalar, giving you an opportunity to help your faction attack or defend a zone. While the assaulting faction tries to break through their enemy’s defenses, defenders must rally the local forces to drive the invaders away.
Tinder is great because there are often times where you are not casting Fireball for prolonged periods of time due to moving from area to area. This talent will make your first Fireball on almost every new encounter do more damage, and be extremely quick. Combined with Firestarter it is a guaranteed Critical Strike, giving you Heating Up, which you can then follow up with a Fire Blast giving you a Hot Streak instantly on almost any new target you fight.

Drustvar is far and away the hardest Alliance zone, which is exactly why you want to do it first. If you have legendary items, they’ll still be usable, and if you don’t, this zone will still be easier early on than it will be later. Drustvar is also extremely fast and will let you jump out ahead of your competition in other zones, which means fewer players around to take your quest objectives.
The upcoming raid, Battle of Dazar’Alor, tackles this problem by having the Horde and Alliance have two raid stories — and the opposite faction will temporary flip sides for flashbacks that show the whole story. The Alliance storm the Zandalar capital and gain a massive upper hand in the war. From there, the writers will have to balance a compelling Alliance story with the rising threat of the Old Gods (and, of course, the ongoing Horde story.)
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