Repetitive daily quests are a legitimate method of generating significant cashflow. Players who spend several hours a day doing daily quests can often generate 100 per hour. Many players have funded the purchase of their elite flying mounts solely through doing daily quests. Another trick for higher level players is to do level 70 dailies as a level 75-77. If you have a hankering to get a Netherdrake, for instance, and you already have a fast flying mount (which is a pre-requisite for the drake), you will find your mid-70s an ideal time to go get that drake. Not only will the quests be a lot easier to do at level 75+, but the dailies will pay about 1200 as you level rep, and you'll get XP along the way to boot (albeit not as much as quests in Northrend.) So if you're looking for a break from the grind of leveling to 80, and want to kick back, spank some level 69s and make some decent money along the way, doing lower level dailies can be a fun way to make some extra cash.
Aaron "Sours" Shaffer is a former competitor who played Hunter in the second Tespa Great Collegiate Dungeon Race in 2016 and MDI 2017. He then transitioned into casting, helping to bring North American and Chinese MDI to your screens, as well as taking on a role as an analyst at the first ever MDI LAN. He hopes to help highlight the skill and talent of the world’s best dungeon runners. His advice to the competitors is to "focus on your own game—it's not about who makes the first mistake in a race, it's about who makes the last". His goal with the MDI program is for viewers to appreciate the time and effort that competitors put into optimizing their play when they stand at the top of the world.
Thanks so much for the replies. I think I am somewhat of a collector/roster builder. I go around doing the dailies but I also like buying pets just for their looks. I watched hazelnutty on youtube last night. I think I will focus on doing the expeditions when I have time to get all the pets that come from that. Then I will go back and do old raids like Eekwibble suggested.

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One of my favorite features is the Smart Injection System, which automatically determines the optimal place for your character to get started with the guides, based on your level and quest history. In other words, it doesn’t matter what level you are currently, you can jump right in and continue seamlessly with the guides. It also means that you don’t have to be a slave to the guides, they work perfectly even if you’re also leveling in instances, battlegrounds, using heirlooms or rested EXP. If your level ever gets ahead of the guide, just use the built-in feature to skip to the right place again. Very cool.
Azerite equipment is currently balanced around being able to unlock the outermost, earliest tier of power immediately upon acquisition, while delaying further advancement until the Heart has been further empowered. For example, the first piece of Azerite equipment, gained shortly after the Heart itself, is fully empowered once the Heart of Azeroth has reached level 3. A character at 120 (the maximum for the expansion) may find a piece whose first tier requires the Heart to have grown to level 12 or greater.
Once your character makes it to Outland and beyond, cashflow frees up considerably. The quest rewards are much better than in Azeroth. In fact, a typical character will earn from 1000-1200 in quest rewards and vendor trash while leveling 60-70 in Outland, and perhaps 1400-1600 from 70-80 in Northrend. The tendency is, therefore, to spend more freely after one hits 60. However, it is important for players not to go crazy on their spending once they make it to Hellfire. One thing is, training costs, repair costs, and consumable costs are also higher. More important, there is a large purchase that you are going to want to make at some point after level 60, your first flying mount and skill. The "bird" costs 40, the skill will cost you far more. Not only that, but if you want to fly it in Northrend at level 70, you'll have to shell out another 400 for Cold Weather Flying. And for those characters who will be 'farming' herbs or ore in either Outland or Northrend, an elite flying mount is almost essential, as it helps you gather almost twice as fast. That's another 5000 you'll be looking at. Therefore, budgeting carefully during the 60-80 leveling process is essential to ensuring you have sufficient cash on hand for making those purchases. Saving your pennies early makes that bird appear that much sooner.
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