When assigning a selling price, do not aim for too low a price that would give you too little profit, but certainly do not assign too high a price. Too much greed is never a good thing, and the AH is filled with items that do not sell due to excessive inflation. A very common tactic in the AH is to sell for lower than what another player is offering, and many players make a lot of money that way. Similarly, losing sales thanks to being undercut is never fun. Aim for as low a price you can that will still make you a good profit. If you can keep producing the same item over and over, sell cheaply yet make a good amount of the item, you will reliably make a lot of money by volume. Moving inventory is the best kind of inventory.
There is a constant market for transmutations. If you are capable of doing these, you can charge an upcharge on each of those transmutes. A player who logs on his/her character each day, and sticks to it, can generate a significant subsidiary revenue scheme through transmutes. Likewise, if you have a transmute that allows you to transmute a lower value element (such as Earth) into a high-priced one (like Water or Fire), you can make a cool 15-20 profit every day by simply doing your transmutes.
Thanks so much for the replies. I think I am somewhat of a collector/roster builder. I go around doing the dailies but I also like buying pets just for their looks. I watched hazelnutty on youtube last night. I think I will focus on doing the expeditions when I have time to get all the pets that come from that. Then I will go back and do old raids like Eekwibble suggested.
I'm very, very interested in a guide that takes into the following: 1) Dungeon finder; and 2) Heirloom items. I've never helped with a guide before, but would be open to help in collaborating on the project. With the leveling guides I've used (primarily this one) I, too, find that I level at a rate that throws the pace of the guide way off (not its fault at all, I can't say enough good stuff about the guide) to the point that I get frustrated and just queue up for dungeons.
Hazzikostas notes that in the ever-changing Ship of Theseus that is World of Warcraft, talents and level progression have been approached from many different angles. Talent points that allowed you to progressively add 1 percent to your Shadowbolt felt like filler, or certain talents were mandatory for a class to function. There were a couple of interesting choices — do I take the 21 point talent in Protection, or go for the 31 point talent in Holy?
These farms are class specific but can be done with class trials. You can only play a class trial for three hours, so before you have to remember to mail any gold or items before that. When your three hours have gone, simply make a new character. Many of these farms are very good if you can park a character at the farm, log in, farm a while, then come back and farm more at a later time.

2. Achieving. There are many pet battling achievements in game, and following the natural trail through the Taming [Continent] achievements up to Pandaria, and then on to the Spirit Tamers, Beasts of Fable and the Celestial Tournament was an epic journey for me and for many others. It's well worth doing. The Celestial Tournament is still, IMO, the pinnacle of PvE pet battling. However, WoD and Legion and BfA have added more battling achievements.
Escort quests can take awhile to do.  I have thoroughly tested all the escort quests in the game for time/xp.  Most are worth doing, but as long as you are able to actually do them without failing.  Most require you to pay special attention to the escortee as most are fragile and will die easily, so do your best to keep mobs off of the escortee during escort quests.  The longest one in the game is the Tanaris chicken escort.  The chicken escorts are only worth doing if you were able to do all 3 of them, as if you do, you will be able to turn in an additional easy quick XP turn in quest at BB, which makes them worth it.

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Most classes in World of Warcraft start at first level, but Death Knights and Demon Hunters are exceptions. They start at level 55 and 98, respectively. This alone can shave a huge chunk of time from your leveling experience. Of course, it only works if you want to play a Death Knight or Demon Hunter, but they’re both solid classics that can dish out damage or tank in a group.
The Broken Isles are unique among WoW continents in that you can progress through zones in any order you want. Once you have made it through the initial quests in Legion, you are free to move about four of the new zones — Val’sharah, Azsuna, Stormheim, and Highmountain — as you wish, with enemies, quests, and rewards scaling to your level. The fifth zone, Suramar, is mostly locked away until you’ve reached a certain point in the story.
Is the path faster than that of any other guide? I can’t really answer that, not having played through all of them to 90, but you will certainly move at a very fast pace. You will never wonder about where to go and what to do next. Consider this, also: Zygor advertises a 1-90 time of under 7 days. That’s as fast as anybody does it. I can also state that you’ll never be at a loss as to where to go or what to do. Zygor’s avoids the time wasting quests, as well. Overall, we’ve found it easy to use and we can just go boom, boom, boom through the quests. Very nice.

By the way, both the guide window and the waypoint arrow can be moved anywhere on screen.  I usually keep the arrow top center and the guide at the bottom right, but go ahead an put it anywhere it makes sense for you. You can even disappear the guide window anytime you like. No point in having it up while you’re raiding the other side’s towns, right? 😉


Quality gear. These can be greens, rares, whatever. However, always think, "Who needs this?" Items that have stats like Stamina are typically useful to all players. Items with stats like Spirit are only useful to a subset. Items that combine two highly sought-after stats, like Stamina and Intelligence (which all casters need) will sell for more than items that combine two stats like Agility and Spirit (which practically no class needs).
As an example, I know that prices for Goblin Glider Kits fluctuates a lot. I used to sell mine for around 30-40 gold each about 2 months ago, but recently the market was flooded with them so the price is down to under 10g each on my server. By experience I am pretty certain that the prices will go up again, so right now I am hoarding them on one alt, both by making them myself and by buying them on the AH when they are really cheap. As soon as the price goes back over 20g I will start unloading them for a profit.
So tonight I took the plunge and thought hey let me buy a Zygor Guides subscription to see how it is. A guide backed by a subscriber base paying for a premium experience this has to be great right? I was wrong. I tested it by loading it up on the Honorboud Rep Guide. Cool it tells me to do World Quests and Island Expeditions. So far so good but hang on... What about the Wanted Quests? Those are by far the biggest boost to reputation. It did not mention them at all. So I thought that's fine it's probably because BFA is quite new. Loaded up a leveling guide on an alt. It was a complete mess. The guide was telling me to accept quests that A) would be horribly inefficient to level with and B) I already done. I also started noticing weird performance issues. Zygor was causing stuttering and FPS dips like crazy. So to close off I requested a refund and the person I spoke to did say I'll be getting one but we will see if that happens. Not getting my hopes up.
That being said, there are occasions when a little kindness is not unwarranted. A typical example is a new player who just dinged level 20. They are suddenly confronted with a whole set of relatively expensive skills at his or her class trainer, and the cost of mount and riding training, and needs a small amount of money to learn those new skills. Likewise, sometimes one sees a player who, just by the way he or she walks, is clearly a new player. Kindness to non-whiny, well-intentioned, legitimately inquisitive newbies is karmically rewarding, and one should not worry about shelling out an occasional boon to such players. Remember, at that level, a few gold can go a long way. Heck, even a few older bags that you have lying around collecting dust in your vault will often be much appreciated.
This farm almost did not make this list. Even though I have had only a little luck with it, it seems to be gathering some popularity in the gold farming community.  Although I feel with the recent changes in 7.3,  this farm is very close to dying out.  Generally what you want to to do is pull every mob you can as you venture to the last boss in the instance.  The only saving grace of this farm (if you can call it that) is that some mobs are GUARANTEED to drop greens.  Guaranteed.  Whether or not they drop profitable greens is a different question, however it's a must-mention quirk you get from running this instance.  It also allows you to get your hands on some rare low level blues.
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