Battle for Azeroth’s War Mode puts you into PvP mode and grants you 10 percent extra experience. But since the two factions will mostly level in separate zones entirely, you should almost definitely have this on when you’re leveling. That said, if you start getting killed by random PvP players consistently, stop using it. Although 10 percent is nice, it’s not worth dying every few minutes for.
For items that you can gather directly, you have the choice of either going out to gather them yourself or to buy them from the AH. The former adds no cost to your item but requires time and effort, while the latter can be quick and hassle-free. Even should you choose to get the materials yourself, don't forget to add them to your cost — your labor and time should be compensated for, even if just a little.
Rogues can make fast money from pickpocketing mobs, opening lockboxes and selling items that drop from those on the AH. If you don't have a rogue make one and get him to at least level 16. Rogues can also make some money by picking locks for people and getting tips. Not a great revenue source, but a decent one to supplement multiple strategies for making money. Generally, the usual lockpicking tip is between 50s to 1 gold, the most common being 50 silver. Sometimes, you can get lucky and have someone tip up to 5 gold for lockpicking several (or even just one) boxes. It's always beneficial for a rogue spending time doing repairing, training, etc. in a city to put up a lockpicking advertisement on the trade channel. Just make sure you let the buyers decide the price and that your lockpicking level is high enough.

You can destroy your competitors so thoroughly, and own a server so totally, that other players could stop playing the game.  I show you how these competitors can also be your buyers, your supporters, your peons or employees and everyone on your whole server can profit and grow in riches together.  Do not buy this guide if you want to cause distress to other players.
Certain locations in World of Warcraft – primarily inns, capital cities, and private instanced zones like your garrison or class order hall – are rest areas. You know you’ve entered one because your character portrait will gain a “Zzz” icon where your level is normally shown, and because you can immediately log out of the game instead of waiting 20 seconds.
Aaron "Sours" Shaffer is a former competitor who played Hunter in the second Tespa Great Collegiate Dungeon Race in 2016 and MDI 2017. He then transitioned into casting, helping to bring North American and Chinese MDI to your screens, as well as taking on a role as an analyst at the first ever MDI LAN. He hopes to help highlight the skill and talent of the world’s best dungeon runners. His advice to the competitors is to "focus on your own game—it's not about who makes the first mistake in a race, it's about who makes the last". His goal with the MDI program is for viewers to appreciate the time and effort that competitors put into optimizing their play when they stand at the top of the world.
You can earn a decent amount of XP by doing Herbalism or mining. Any zone works but I prefer Sholazar Basin as a lot of the mobs are not aggressive and the mobs are spread out so you will find a lot of herbs and ore that you don’t have to fight for. It is possible to make about a level every hour by doing this, or a level every 30-40 minutes with rest XP.
The best way to collect AP is through world quests, a system that allows players to complete menial tasks to earn moderate rewards. A finite amount of AP spawns on the map through these quests — generally at least 2,000 a day. I’ve likely done most of these quests close to 20 times in the course of preparing my various characters in the 45 days since the expansion launched. In some cases, I’ve replayed them as many as 50 times.
Of course this is pure speculation, but who thought the token would be beneath 200.000 Gold again? But the only thing important for you is to calculate at what point you make profit by selling the tokens again. If you consider it, you should take the risk! Worst case scenario: You have a lot of battle.net balance to spend for Gametime, mounts, pets and boosts/services!
Once your character makes it to Outland and beyond, cashflow frees up considerably. The quest rewards are much better than in Azeroth. In fact, a typical character will earn from 1000-1200 in quest rewards and vendor trash while leveling 60-70 in Outland, and perhaps 1400-1600 from 70-80 in Northrend. The tendency is, therefore, to spend more freely after one hits 60. However, it is important for players not to go crazy on their spending once they make it to Hellfire. One thing is, training costs, repair costs, and consumable costs are also higher. More important, there is a large purchase that you are going to want to make at some point after level 60, your first flying mount and skill. The "bird" costs 40, the skill will cost you far more. Not only that, but if you want to fly it in Northrend at level 70, you'll have to shell out another 400 for Cold Weather Flying. And for those characters who will be 'farming' herbs or ore in either Outland or Northrend, an elite flying mount is almost essential, as it helps you gather almost twice as fast. That's another 5000 you'll be looking at. Therefore, budgeting carefully during the 60-80 leveling process is essential to ensuring you have sufficient cash on hand for making those purchases. Saving your pennies early makes that bird appear that much sooner.
×