The same goes for the level 40 mount. An elite ground mount means still-faster leveling. Not only that, but you'll get knocked off considerably less often by mobs while getting around inside zones, meaning you'll die less often as well. Remember, as the goblins are so fond of saying, "Time is money, friend!" So it behooves you to get an elite ground mount as rapidly as possible.
Level 120 comes and goes. Island Expeditions have unlocked, but it turns out they’re not much fun, and the most rewarding versions are only accessible to premade groups. You turn to Warfronts only to realize they’re not available this week. Fine. You can always grind out better gear. Except as you do, you notice your new gear has higher Azerite requirements than your old gear, which means your shiny new items have fewer unlocked traits than what they replaced. Discouraged, you decide to roll as one of the cool new Allied Races. Except you can’t because they’re all locked behind reputation grinds.
The most important step in being able to buy a mount and make other large purchases should be self-evident: saving. Economize as often as you can, and don't buy anything unless you absolutely have to. You can burn through hundreds of gold even before level 20 by visiting the auction house for new equipment at every opportunity. If you do so, over the long haul you will be left with very little to show for it. Before level 20, keep your eyes on the prize: getting that mount. The mount helps you move faster. Faster movement means faster killing, faster questing, faster quest turn-ins, and faster leveling. It is the most important tool to fast leveling you can get at level 20, and infinitely more important than getting your hands on that Left-Handed Vorpal Cleaver of the Zipswitch that you could have purchased at level 23. Stay focused.

Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As the fires of war continue to roar, take the battle to both new and familiar lands with the Tides of Vengeance update, and join your allies to champion your faction’s cause.


The downside is that War Mode will make you vulnerable to other players, which means you might be killed more often. Whether it’s worthwhile will depend on the zones you’re visiting and how active the other faction is on your server cluster. Heavily populated realms usually mean more players on both sides, and more conflict, but on quieter realms, you may rarely run across an enemy.
Using the Looking for Group interface, or joining a good guild, and doing instances that are around your level. You'll learn valuable grouping skills, and the level of loot in an instance is typically much better than what you could find on your own. If possible, concentrate on instances with humanoid mobs, since selling the cloth that they drop is a good way to make money.
You can earn a decent amount of XP by doing Herbalism or mining. Any zone works but I prefer Sholazar Basin as a lot of the mobs are not aggressive and the mobs are spread out so you will find a lot of herbs and ore that you don’t have to fight for. It is possible to make about a level every hour by doing this, or a level every 30-40 minutes with rest XP.

A cool little pet farm that can take minutes or ages depending on the god of luck.  This spot contains some of the most dense troll spawns in the game, and each has the highest chance to drop the parrot pet thats soo sought after.  On every serve rthis per has  amedian value of about 70,000g so picking one up can be a pretty cool feat.  Like the sprite darter hatchling spot its, a random farming spot that requires alot of RNG to pull off, but if you get it to drop you can make out in spades.  The other drops are miniscule when compared to this spot.


Once your character makes it to Outland and beyond, cashflow frees up considerably. The quest rewards are much better than in Azeroth. In fact, a typical character will earn from 1000-1200 in quest rewards and vendor trash while leveling 60-70 in Outland, and perhaps 1400-1600 from 70-80 in Northrend. The tendency is, therefore, to spend more freely after one hits 60. However, it is important for players not to go crazy on their spending once they make it to Hellfire. One thing is, training costs, repair costs, and consumable costs are also higher. More important, there is a large purchase that you are going to want to make at some point after level 60, your first flying mount and skill. The "bird" costs 40, the skill will cost you far more. Not only that, but if you want to fly it in Northrend at level 70, you'll have to shell out another 400 for Cold Weather Flying. And for those characters who will be 'farming' herbs or ore in either Outland or Northrend, an elite flying mount is almost essential, as it helps you gather almost twice as fast. That's another 5000 you'll be looking at. Therefore, budgeting carefully during the 60-80 leveling process is essential to ensuring you have sufficient cash on hand for making those purchases. Saving your pennies early makes that bird appear that much sooner.
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