While this is more a method than a farm, I still thought it belonged in this video.  This method takes advantage of the long forgotten spell, void shatter.  Generally because of the logistics behind how easily obtainable void crystals are when compared to large prismatic shards, void crystals cost SUBSTANTIALLY less.  The void shatter spell however turns 1 void crystal into 2 large prismatic shards.  Globally large prismatic shards are worth 15g a piece, while void crystals trend around 2-4g a piece.  Can you do the math on that?  You can literally triple your investment cost by creating more prismatic shards for your market.  All it requires is for you to get honored with the shattered sun offensive, a little known fact that most enchanters are too lazy to take advantage of.  Nobody is doing this, and on most servers the market it ripe to take over.  Don't believe me?  Check it out yourself!
Guilds are perhaps one the most effective ways of progressing your character, and in turn, making money. Most 'high-end' guilds have a guild bank where members donate items for other members. This may range from potions, reagents, and craftable plans. Usually you will have to donate to a guild bank in order to receive items as well as stay active in your guild, but receiving potions that will aid your progression and craftable plans allowing you to profit off selling the products will benefit you in the long run. Also, donating to your guild bank may mean donating something you cannot use in turn receiving something you can use. Sometimes, additional services such as VoIP servers are provided and play a key role especially in end-game content; communication is paramount to a the success of an efficient group. Efficiency results in receiving gear faster, running more frequently in a shorter amount of time, and in turn making more money from runs. In a well put together guild, members become a close knit community including financial and questing support, which are among the most profitable benefits. If you have not considered joining a guild as part of your strategy moving through the game, you may wish to strongly reconsider.
Most classes in World of Warcraft start at first level, but Death Knights and Demon Hunters are exceptions. They start at level 55 and 98, respectively. This alone can shave a huge chunk of time from your leveling experience. Of course, it only works if you want to play a Death Knight or Demon Hunter, but they’re both solid classics that can dish out damage or tank in a group.

Good question. Me personally, when I use a new strat from somebody else, I always read thru the strat, and in the case I really need to level some pet, I then (likely) exclude strats that are mentioning things like “RNG”, “risk”, etc. But: I’m always happy (when using a new strat) when I see some detailed infos, so that I can estimate what is going to happen. But YMMV.
I like his recommendations 2 level 1-20 zones to get to 20, then do all the 2nd zones since they are designed for walking (Horde: Northern Barrens, Silverpine Forest, Ghostlands, Azshara, & Hillsbrad Foothills if you need a little more. Alliance: Westfall, Loch Modan, Darkshore, Bloodmyst Isle, and if you need a little more Redridge Mtns, or Duskwood). Don't even bother with the higher level areas, too spread out. Finishing up a Monk now and I had done all these zones before the update, the running between quest and the 50% experience cap is driving me crazy.
This farm almost did not make this list. Even though I have had only a little luck with it, it seems to be gathering some popularity in the gold farming community.  Although I feel with the recent changes in 7.3,  this farm is very close to dying out.  Generally what you want to to do is pull every mob you can as you venture to the last boss in the instance.  The only saving grace of this farm (if you can call it that) is that some mobs are GUARANTEED to drop greens.  Guaranteed.  Whether or not they drop profitable greens is a different question, however it's a must-mention quirk you get from running this instance.  It also allows you to get your hands on some rare low level blues. 

This will essentially compare DBHistorical, DBRegionMarketAvg and DBRegionHistorical and then use which ever of these price sources valued the item the lowest to assess the value of an item. This way TSM will hopefully not overvalue items. You could even go a step further and add DBMarket and/or even DBMinBuyout to the string. Then TSM will be even more pessimistic when valuing items.
Darkmoon Faire: The Darkmoon Faire comes around once a month and provides two ways of bonus XP. You can ride the carousel to get the “Whee!” buff (10% bonus XP for one hour). You can also get the Darkmoon Top Hat by playing a few games, which gives you 10% bonus XP but only works during the Darkmoon Faire. Both of these are generally not worth it for the most part, as you spend more time running to get the buff than you gain in XP when leveling.
Allied races are variants of existing races. The Void Elves are a version of Night Elves, while the Highmount Tauren are, you guessed it, a version of the Tauren. Four allied races are already in the game before launch and two more, the Dark Iron Dwarves and Mag’har Orcs, were added after Battle for Azeroth launched. Each Allied Race has its own racial abilities. You can also unlock a heritage armor set by leveling any Allied Race to the level cap.
Herbalism is also a good source of money. Herbs are required by alchemists and scribes. Unlike ore which is found only in rocky areas, herbs can be found in many places. Be sure to check on the auction house for what herbs are in demand for a high value; often a lower level one is very valuable, so you can farm an area you already know for quick money.

That’s because armor of higher level has higher Azerite power requirements than lower level armor. That means a shiny new piece of Epic gear will have better stats but, unless you’ve been diligent about your Azerite power grind, won’t have as many traits unlocked. You lose options as you earn better gear. Eventually, you’ll grind out enough Azerite to earn those traits back, but you’re left with limited customization until then.

Overall, I'm very disappointed that half of them are barely even worth crafting, and there's little equality between them either, but still pleasantly surprised with how Alch and Tailoring turned out. Skinning, Herb and Mining not having anything even though they all have small crafting abilities is a big disappointment too; those three really should get rolled into other professions/become secondary professions with this kind of neglect.
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For example, the Azure Whelpling belongs to the Dragonkin family. However, it has Beast, Magic, and Elemental abilities in addition to a Dragonkin attack. Different attacks are strong and weak against different family types. Having a diverse spell selection might increase your chances of being prepared with a strong attack against an opposing team.

In World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth for PC, there will be a stat squish and item squish to lower the numbers used in the game, an example being a legendary item scaled for Antorus: The Burning Throne (the final raid for Legion) being reduced from item level 1000 to 330. Unique buffs are added back; these buffs are class specific which are mages’ Arcane Brilliance, druids’ Mark of the Wild, etc. Titanforging—something that allows for an item to be more powerful than normal—is still in World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth for PC; however, if the item is one of those affected by the Heart of Azeroth, then that item cannot be titanforged.


These iconic locations will look a little different than what players see on the live servers. Hook Point and Mugambala on the Tournament Realm resemble marketplaces, full of vendors that will provide players with the specific gear required for MDI—the best gear from dungeons and raids, all set to item level 415—as well as pots, flasks, gems, and enchants. All a mythic dungeon-runner could desire, sold at the bargain price of zero Gold. This is to ensure that all players in the MDI race will have access to all the things they feel is the best fit for their character and for their team’s overall composition and strategy.


Unless low quality items have some known quest use or are coveted by other players, you should try to sell it as soon as possible to create bag space. Always (or almost always, see above exceptions) keep things like cloth, leather, herbs, or large stacks of white/gray items over other loot when you have to decide what to keep when your bags get full. It might be worth your while to invest in larger bags (10-20 slot), especially if you know a tailor.
The biggest gold maker in BfA for inscription is the Darkmoon Decks. In fact they are pretty much the only truly profitable recipe this expansion. Milling is a pain as you generate thousands of useless ultramarine pigments. You can use some of you crimson and ultramarine inks to craft Tome of the Quiet Mind to get rid of them. I have also found that the item level 300/310 off-hands that inscription can craft sell quite well.
As for the classes themselves, they almost all play like slower and slightly less interesting versions of their Legion counterparts. This is thanks in large part to the loss of one ability from each class that came along with Legion’s own AP dumping system: the artifact weapon, which added a unique ability to every spec in the game. The loss of these abilities left most classes feeling frustrating and incomplete, and though Azerite gear was supposed to be the replacement, it missed the mark completely. There will always be one Azerite trait that reigns supreme for each spec, meaning that the frustration of that particular loop will be unavoidable as long as the system is in the game.
Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As this age-old conflict reignites, gather your allies and champion your faction’s cause—for Azeroth’s future will be forged in the fires of war.
Sometimes you can make money by crafting items with ingredients supplied by other players who give you a tip to make the item. This is not necessarily a reliable source at low levels, but it can be a good supplemental income source at higher levels, particularly if you have good recipes. And if you can charge for the customer using your materials (as opposed to materials supplied by him/her), you can mark those up.
Darkmoon Faire: The Darkmoon Faire comes around once a month and provides two ways of bonus XP. You can ride the carousel to get the “Whee!” buff (10% bonus XP for one hour). You can also get the Darkmoon Top Hat by playing a few games, which gives you 10% bonus XP but only works during the Darkmoon Faire. Both of these are generally not worth it for the most part, as you spend more time running to get the buff than you gain in XP when leveling.
Footholds into enemy territories can be done as you grow in levels and should be completed before reaching Level 120. Take the time after completing your first zone to do your first foothold, or you can choose to complete one as soon as you gather your 100 War Resources which will prompt you to return to your mission table area where the first foothold quest can be obtained. Similar to how your initial zone selection was largely irrelevant, this selection is, as well. Simply pick one and complete it to earn your Mission Table second champion. Send your champions out on missions, recruit troops, and then head back out to quest in your second zone selection.
These iconic locations will look a little different than what players see on the live servers. Hook Point and Mugambala on the Tournament Realm resemble marketplaces, full of vendors that will provide players with the specific gear required for MDI—the best gear from dungeons and raids, all set to item level 415—as well as pots, flasks, gems, and enchants. All a mythic dungeon-runner could desire, sold at the bargain price of zero Gold. This is to ensure that all players in the MDI race will have access to all the things they feel is the best fit for their character and for their team’s overall composition and strategy.
The recruit also grants the recruiter levels, with the latter gaining one level for every two levels the recruit gains. There are a lot of rules and restrictions to that, however. It all basically boils down to leveling alternate characters together. The recruiter can even earn epic mounts and battle pets if you stick with the game for a couple months.
With Legion, character arcs like Illidan’s redemption became a central pillar of the main story. Battle for Azeroth has expand on that in a big way by focusing on key characters from Warcraft’s lore. Players will see the next chapter in the story of heroes like Anduin Wrynn, Slyvanas, Jaina Proudmoore, Thrall, and everyone’s favorite troll, Vol’jin.

The upcoming raid, Battle of Dazar’Alor, tackles this problem by having the Horde and Alliance have two raid stories — and the opposite faction will temporary flip sides for flashbacks that show the whole story. The Alliance storm the Zandalar capital and gain a massive upper hand in the war. From there, the writers will have to balance a compelling Alliance story with the rising threat of the Old Gods (and, of course, the ongoing Horde story.)
Note that these general principles do not apply to blue or purple items. If you are a first-time player, there is absolutely no reason to purchase these items. None. Sub-80 rare and epic items are only for the alts or twinks of established players that have money to waste (because that's what it is) by showing off their Staff of Jordan (or whatever). Blues and purples are completely cost-ineffective for first-time characters. Within a few levels, you will find green gear that is roughly comparable, or you'll get better blues from instance runs at the same level. So, do not buy these items, under any circumstances, if you are a first-time character (no matter how cool they look). And even if you're reasonably well-off financially, think twice. This is especially true as your character gets closer to levels 58 and 68. Even the most basic quest-reward gear in Outland will have substantially better stats than anything you can buy off the AH for a level 56 character. The same is true of Northrend gear at level 68 vis-a-vis the stuff you'll get in Outland at level 68. As such, smart players stop making AH gear purchases by about level 54 or so, and then just gut it out until level 58. The same is true at levels 64-68. Within the first several quests in Hellfire and/or Northrend you'll have replaced half of your gear in any case, guaranteed.

Nov 13 What are the differences between versions? I just have a trial at the moment but i'm confused on what each version offers. Normal Sub : $15 a month Battle for Azeroth: $50 (needs subscription) Complete Colelction: $60 As far as i knew if you had a subscription to the game you get all of the content minus the latest expansion. So let me see if this is right. If i were to get the complete collection i would get one month at a $5 discount and the newest expansion OR Just pay $15 For the game and all expansions EXCEPT BFA?Buresh2 Nov 13
Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As this age-old conflict reignites, join your allies and champion your faction’s cause—Azeroth’s future will be forged in the fires of war in World of Warcraft: Battle for Azeroth for PC.
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