This is cumulative, as you take into account each failed sale as a loss. In the event too many deposits accumulate, you must decide whether to continue selling the item inflated by too many sales or finding of another way to dispose of it. One final tip: when you find that an item fails to sell in one AH, selling it on the other may finally dispose of it and get you your earnings.

This guide covers many of the ins and outs of both making money, and spending it wisely. Many players have "secret" strategies for making money that they wouldn't want to put in a public info site, since it gives them their edge in the marketplace. If you can gain the trust of a successful WoW tycoon, you should ask them some of their techniques. However, this guide covers many of the more common strategies.
This is an infinte farming spot that takes place just east of maraudon.   It requires you to stand in a specific spot which will allow you to kill all the slitherblade naga that surround the river.  This spot is generally a GREAT spot since the mobs respawn instantly after death.  You will get an obscene amount of silk, wool, greens, and low level patterns.  It's one of the only remaining infinite respawn farms left in the game.
Dec 28, 2016 Better Living through Technology!(new2macros) *note: this guide is for people who haven't used macros or advanced keybinds and want to try. Macros are basically 'super buttons' that you can create in order to use multiple abilities and spells from the same button. This means even if you have 15 different abilities, you can key them all to 3-5 buttons. With macros you can do things like: 1) have all your buff spells on one button 2) 'hide' abilities that you don't use very often so they only show when you need them 3) 'group' similar abilities so that, for example, all your commonly used melee skills are on one button 4) maximize your rotation so that you're always one step ahead of the GCD Macros are great, but there are a few limitations: 1) complicated! -learning macros takes a good chunk of time. It's only something I've been able to do since my work gives me some 'free time' to cruise the UI/macro forum. 2) software limited -While very powerful, there is potential to abuse macros so that, for example, you could hit one button and your character would kill every mob in range (eventually). This potential for abuse has cause blizzard to put some powerful limitations on macros. More about this later. 3) the One Button rule -each macro button can use only one ability each time you press the button. You can code this so that it will use a different ability each and every time you press it (and on a different target!), but you can't press the button once and, for example, have it cast all 5 self buffs on you. I don't even know where to start?! To get started with macros, it's very simple. Just log on WoW and type /m. This brings up your macro box, where you just have to hit 'new' and the game will prompt for a name and an icon. I recommend that you leave the icon as a question mark. (?) The question mark means the game will automatically pick up the picture of the ability that the macro will use. My First Macro For your first macro lets just replace a normal ability you use on your bar in combat. I'm going to use paladin abilities here, but you can replace them with whatever ability you like. So to make my first macro, I went to the /m menu in game, picked a new macro, and gave it the question mark icon. Then I click on the icon, click on the empty box, and type: /cast This is the basic core of every macro. It's basically like the verb in a sentence. You can use different 'verbs' (called slash commands) but this is probably the most popular. Since I want this macro to cast Hammer of the Righteous, I simple type that in after the /cast. /cast Hammer of the Righteous And pow! I'm done! If you drag this onto your bar and hit it a million times, you basically have the paladin protection spec in a nutshell (lol). However this doesn't really give you any extra functionality over a normal keybind. The next thing I'm going to do is make the macro heal a friendly if I have a friendly targeted, or if it's an enemy it will use SotR (shield of the righteous). To do this you add a conditional. This says 'only cast this spell if 'X' is true.' It looks like this (with a breakdown of the macro underneath): /cast [help] Word of Glory; [harm] Shield of the Righteous \__/ \____/\__________/\/ \____/\__________________/ verb-conditional---|---separator|----------------| -------------------ability---------conditional----Ability What this macro will do is check the status of your current target. A 'friendly'(help) value will cause my paladin to heal the target. An 'enemy'(harm) value will trigger the attack ability. If you can grasp macros thus far, you've already learned enough to make macros useful for you. Putting this on your bar will basically cut the number of keybinds you need by 1. Modifier macro commands Another handy feature you can use with macros is called a Modifier. This may sound familiar but it's possible to set a macro so that it will use a different ability or spell if you hold down control, alt, or shift. Here's a basic example: /cast [mod:alt] Seal of Truth;[mod:ctrl] Blessing of Kings;[mod:shift] Righteous Fury; Seal of Insight If you had this macro bound to 1, and you press 1, it would cast Seal of truth (and the seal picture would be on the keybind). Pressin ctrl would change the icon to blessing of kings and would cast blessing of kings if you pressed ctrl-1, etc....Raygecow149 Dec 28, 2016
Dec 28, 2016 Better Living through Technology!(new2macros) *note: this guide is for people who haven't used macros or advanced keybinds and want to try. Macros are basically 'super buttons' that you can create in order to use multiple abilities and spells from the same button. This means even if you have 15 different abilities, you can key them all to 3-5 buttons. With macros you can do things like: 1) have all your buff spells on one button 2) 'hide' abilities that you don't use very often so they only show when you need them 3) 'group' similar abilities so that, for example, all your commonly used melee skills are on one button 4) maximize your rotation so that you're always one step ahead of the GCD Macros are great, but there are a few limitations: 1) complicated! -learning macros takes a good chunk of time. It's only something I've been able to do since my work gives me some 'free time' to cruise the UI/macro forum. 2) software limited -While very powerful, there is potential to abuse macros so that, for example, you could hit one button and your character would kill every mob in range (eventually). This potential for abuse has cause blizzard to put some powerful limitations on macros. More about this later. 3) the One Button rule -each macro button can use only one ability each time you press the button. You can code this so that it will use a different ability each and every time you press it (and on a different target!), but you can't press the button once and, for example, have it cast all 5 self buffs on you. I don't even know where to start?! To get started with macros, it's very simple. Just log on WoW and type /m. This brings up your macro box, where you just have to hit 'new' and the game will prompt for a name and an icon. I recommend that you leave the icon as a question mark. (?) The question mark means the game will automatically pick up the picture of the ability that the macro will use. My First Macro For your first macro lets just replace a normal ability you use on your bar in combat. I'm going to use paladin abilities here, but you can replace them with whatever ability you like. So to make my first macro, I went to the /m menu in game, picked a new macro, and gave it the question mark icon. Then I click on the icon, click on the empty box, and type: /cast This is the basic core of every macro. It's basically like the verb in a sentence. You can use different 'verbs' (called slash commands) but this is probably the most popular. Since I want this macro to cast Hammer of the Righteous, I simple type that in after the /cast. /cast Hammer of the Righteous And pow! I'm done! If you drag this onto your bar and hit it a million times, you basically have the paladin protection spec in a nutshell (lol). However this doesn't really give you any extra functionality over a normal keybind. The next thing I'm going to do is make the macro heal a friendly if I have a friendly targeted, or if it's an enemy it will use SotR (shield of the righteous). To do this you add a conditional. This says 'only cast this spell if 'X' is true.' It looks like this (with a breakdown of the macro underneath): /cast [help] Word of Glory; [harm] Shield of the Righteous \__/ \____/\__________/\/ \____/\__________________/ verb-conditional---|---separator|----------------| -------------------ability---------conditional----Ability What this macro will do is check the status of your current target. A 'friendly'(help) value will cause my paladin to heal the target. An 'enemy'(harm) value will trigger the attack ability. If you can grasp macros thus far, you've already learned enough to make macros useful for you. Putting this on your bar will basically cut the number of keybinds you need by 1. Modifier macro commands Another handy feature you can use with macros is called a Modifier. This may sound familiar but it's possible to set a macro so that it will use a different ability or spell if you hold down control, alt, or shift. Here's a basic example: /cast [mod:alt] Seal of Truth;[mod:ctrl] Blessing of Kings;[mod:shift] Righteous Fury; Seal of Insight If you had this macro bound to 1, and you press 1, it would cast Seal of truth (and the seal picture would be on the keybind). Pressin ctrl would change the icon to blessing of kings and would cast blessing of kings if you pressed ctrl-1, etc....Raygecow149 Dec 28, 2016
**Players can repeat the Battle for Azeroth trial experience with up to 12 characters per qualifying account during the welcome back weekend. The Battle for Azeroth trial experience ends after three hours of game play in Battle for Azeroth, or after the quest "We Need Each Other" (for Horde) or "A Nation Divided" (for Alliance), whichever comes first.

When assigning a selling price, do not aim for too low a price that would give you too little profit, but certainly do not assign too high a price. Too much greed is never a good thing, and the AH is filled with items that do not sell due to excessive inflation. A very common tactic in the AH is to sell for lower than what another player is offering, and many players make a lot of money that way. Similarly, losing sales thanks to being undercut is never fun. Aim for as low a price you can that will still make you a good profit. If you can keep producing the same item over and over, sell cheaply yet make a good amount of the item, you will reliably make a lot of money by volume. Moving inventory is the best kind of inventory.

×