A common mistake of new players is to upgrade their gear at every opportunity, paying for a new piece even if it will only add one or two new stat points over an existing item. Likewise, investing in headgear, neckwear, trinkets, and rings at the earliest available levels can also consume valuable cash. While it might seem foolish to leave an available slot empty, you will eventually find something to fill it. Blizzard will see to it via the quest rewards you'll get along the way. In the mean time, the 1 or more you save will serve you well if you invest it wisely. The bottom line is that one can easily level all the way to the maximum relying on just quest/drop greens. The gear you get from regular questing can help you perform well in dungeons, which gets you even better equipment.

The next step on the stairway to the gold cap is the internet. Often times, WoW players forget that various websites can have good information. However, many of them are dangerous and just filled with lies or exaggerations. It is my advice that you stick to three main websites: Wowhead.com, Worldofwarcraft.com, and Mmo-champion.com. On wowhead.com, one can see average prices overall on every sellable item currently in the game. This is a nice start; however, most servers have economies that differ greatly. I played on one server where a +healing red gem went for 100g and another where the same gem went for 55g. Swings like this are just the beginning. Random drop epics, especially those BoEs from newer content sometimes differ by thousands of gold! (Consider this fact especially if you are planning on transferring, as this can be the greatest gold mine in WoW). Worldofwarcraft.com provides a little known list containing the most common bought items on the auction house across every server in an aggregate sense! This means that they average every server before listing the results. Unlike wowhead.com, this presents the reader with a much more accurate portrayal of what they may expect on their own given server. Results will be slightly different, but this tool should not be overestimated.
The old popular example was the http://www.wowhead.com/item=47257. This item differed on my server from a high of 6k to a low of about 3k. When the price was down at 3k, I would buy a few of these and just wait a week. Throughout the week, I would put in trade and the auction house that I wanted 6k for it. I would then immediately go onto an alt and say that I only wanted 5200g. Sometimes, I would get the 5200g and be a very happy man, other times it would take more patience. However, almost always, by the end of the week, the other sellers had reposted for around what I wanted. This gave me a huge advantage. Now, the price ceiling was no longer 3k on the auction house, but 5k. I could now easily sell the few I bought for 4 or 4.5k, which is a huge 50% profit from the 3k I originally invested.
For more than a year in WOTLK I did nothing but raiding and some dailies here and there. I leveled a bit on a few alts and, as all are aware, it cost to support alts sometimes. I did dailies, and LFG quests until the Dungeon finder came along. I did 2 or 3 randoms then logged off if not a raid night. I was bored with the grind of dailies and wanted a change.
Skinning is both highly profitable and convenient, in that you will be skinning the monsters that you're already killing as you level. A skinner starts by collecting relatively worthless ruined leather scraps, but soon moves on to light leather, which can be sold for a good profit. An excellent way to farm leather is to skin the kills of other players, especially if you are following along in the wake of a group. However, do wait to start skinning until it's clear that the other player has abandoned the kill. Don't assume that the other player doesn't skin just because they are not a leather-wearer, for example. Note that your chances of getting a better grade of leather increases with your experience; it is possible, though rare, to get light leather from rabbits. Higher grades of leather yield higher profits. A skinner/miner has potent earning power through the auction house, but often runs out of inventory space.
Learned this today: posted a comment, came back later to see if there was any feedback, reloaded the page: the page posted a copy of my comment. That was not what I wanted. I just wanted to check if my comment was posted and if there were some responses. I did not want to post a copy of my comment from 5 hours ago. And, a humble guess, I think the majority of the users are not expecting such behavior either.

Nov 7 Game buying guide for confused ppl like me For those of you who were confused as i was, this is about buying the game and what you get so for 15$ subscription - you get all past expansion and 1 month of game time for battle for azeroth (49.99$) - you get the newest expansion for WoW complete collection (59.99) - Newest expansion / 1 month of game time / 110 boost(1x only) I was confused for awhile but now i know that the 49.99$ is the Worst deal ever. I am going to buy some game time for now, and jump up to the 60$ bundle later. The boost is a 60$ value / 1 month of wow 15$ value / and the expansion is a 50$. TOTAL is : 125$ value for 60$. Great deal. So the complete collection is really sweet :) Hope this helps other people. I am buying the game time today and working on this monk. Cheers.Promonk11 Nov 7


There are a lot of skills and spells you can train as you progress, each of which costs money. When you can afford to, you should train all the abilities that your class trainer offers. If you're completely broke, it's fine to put off upgrading abilities you rarely use for a level or two so that you can upgrade your most-used abilities. If this happens, you should ask yourself whether you are spending too much money on buying unnecessary equipment upgrades or leveling production trade skills. Be sure to save enough for class abilities and riding training before spending money on other things. This assumes you're earning money at a rate where buying skills makes a difference at all. If you have a hundred gold from two gathering professions by level 20, those skill ranks costing a fraction of a gold won't make any difference to your purse.
The upcoming raid, Battle of Dazar’Alor, tackles this problem by having the Horde and Alliance have two raid stories — and the opposite faction will temporary flip sides for flashbacks that show the whole story. The Alliance storm the Zandalar capital and gain a massive upper hand in the war. From there, the writers will have to balance a compelling Alliance story with the rising threat of the Old Gods (and, of course, the ongoing Horde story.)
Assassination Rogues make use of damage-over-time attacks to do the majority of their damage. This makes them incredibly strong single target damage dealers. On top of that, Assassination Rogues have many defensive abilities that allow them to survive a wide range of potential encounters as well as mechanics within raids and dungeons. Their weakest point is the lack of multi-target damage abilities. Their rotation is also very cooldown heavy and is only really effective at dealing with single target encounters.
Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1
The downside is that War Mode will make you vulnerable to other players, which means you might be killed more often. Whether it’s worthwhile will depend on the zones you’re visiting and how active the other faction is on your server cluster. Heavily populated realms usually mean more players on both sides, and more conflict, but on quieter realms, you may rarely run across an enemy.
This farm almost did not make this list. Even though I have had only a little luck with it, it seems to be gathering some popularity in the gold farming community.  Although I feel with the recent changes in 7.3,  this farm is very close to dying out.  Generally what you want to to do is pull every mob you can as you venture to the last boss in the instance.  The only saving grace of this farm (if you can call it that) is that some mobs are GUARANTEED to drop greens.  Guaranteed.  Whether or not they drop profitable greens is a different question, however it's a must-mention quirk you get from running this instance.  It also allows you to get your hands on some rare low level blues.
I like his recommendations 2 level 1-20 zones to get to 20, then do all the 2nd zones since they are designed for walking (Horde: Northern Barrens, Silverpine Forest, Ghostlands, Azshara, & Hillsbrad Foothills if you need a little more. Alliance: Westfall, Loch Modan, Darkshore, Bloodmyst Isle, and if you need a little more Redridge Mtns, or Duskwood). Don't even bother with the higher level areas, too spread out. Finishing up a Monk now and I had done all these zones before the update, the running between quest and the 50% experience cap is driving me crazy.
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