Battle for Azeroth, the latest World of Warcraft expansion, has been almost entirely centered around the Horde. The Horde made the first strike in the faction war, burning down the Night Elven home of Teldrassil. Sylvanas, the Warchief of the Horde, stole the spotlight and was the most compelling character in the Battle for Lordaeron. The Zandalar campaign led the Horde to the first raid of Uldir, where Horde heroes slew G’huun. For many Alliance players, there’s a sense that they’ve been tagging along for the ride so far.
There are so many races and characters, so many stories spread across so much material, that any point of view can be argued. Why should the Tauren stand shoulder to shoulder with their fellow druidic race, the Night Elves, when the Tauren were left to the brink of extinction by the Night Elves after being allied 10,000 years ago? Why should the Forsaken care about Stormwind when they were left to die in Lordaeron, with their escape route to Gilneas walled off? And how can the various elves reunite when there’s 10,000 years of bad blood and ancient grudges between them? The developers admittedly love watching the players choose a position and entrench themselves into it for internet arguments and proud declaration of allegiance ... which, after potentially 14 years of a commitment to a side, can feel pretty emotionally powerful.
Rogues can make fast money from pickpocketing mobs, opening lockboxes and selling items that drop from those on the AH. If you don't have a rogue make one and get him to at least level 16. Rogues can also make some money by picking locks for people and getting tips. Not a great revenue source, but a decent one to supplement multiple strategies for making money. Generally, the usual lockpicking tip is between 50s to 1 gold, the most common being 50 silver. Sometimes, you can get lucky and have someone tip up to 5 gold for lockpicking several (or even just one) boxes. It's always beneficial for a rogue spending time doing repairing, training, etc. in a city to put up a lockpicking advertisement on the trade channel. Just make sure you let the buyers decide the price and that your lockpicking level is high enough.
It’s a good thing that the previous expansion, Legion, was the best in the game’s history because Battle for Azeroth is coasting on its success. The major class redesigns that happened then remain in effect (though some are a little worse, and some a little better), and the combination of World Quests and Mythic+ dungeons means there’s always something to do, no matter your skill level or how long you can play.
-Gameplay- Gameplay has largely been stripped down to be a shell of its former self. This trimming has been going on for several expansions, but now it's even worse. Classes only have so many buttons which has resulted in very little skill involved in PvE (even PvP is a faceroll for most melee, lacking any sort of depth and decision-making as it's pretty clear what buttons to press in any given situation) and it's become more of a gear check. This expansion gave zero new abilities to classes, only took them away.
Back in the days of Burning Crusade, leveling up your character was a very tedious procedure. The quests were not even shown on the map, you always had to read through the quest list and figure out where to go and what to do (which mobs to kill, items to retrieve, etc.). After a few more expansions, questing became a little bit easier, due to the quest chains being more linear. You can pretty much follow the main quest storyline. Also, the map became more interactive.

With Legion, character arcs like Illidan’s redemption became a central pillar of the main story. Battle for Azeroth has expand on that in a big way by focusing on key characters from Warcraft’s lore. Players will see the next chapter in the story of heroes like Anduin Wrynn, Slyvanas, Jaina Proudmoore, Thrall, and everyone’s favorite troll, Vol’jin.
These farms are class specific but can be done with class trials. You can only play a class trial for three hours, so before you have to remember to mail any gold or items before that. When your three hours have gone, simply make a new character. Many of these farms are very good if you can park a character at the farm, log in, farm a while, then come back and farm more at a later time.
Guilds are perhaps one the most effective ways of progressing your character, and in turn, making money. Most 'high-end' guilds have a guild bank where members donate items for other members. This may range from potions, reagents, and craftable plans. Usually you will have to donate to a guild bank in order to receive items as well as stay active in your guild, but receiving potions that will aid your progression and craftable plans allowing you to profit off selling the products will benefit you in the long run. Also, donating to your guild bank may mean donating something you cannot use in turn receiving something you can use. Sometimes, additional services such as VoIP servers are provided and play a key role especially in end-game content; communication is paramount to a the success of an efficient group. Efficiency results in receiving gear faster, running more frequently in a shorter amount of time, and in turn making more money from runs. In a well put together guild, members become a close knit community including financial and questing support, which are among the most profitable benefits. If you have not considered joining a guild as part of your strategy moving through the game, you may wish to strongly reconsider.
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